Throwbot XT Reconnaissance Robot, United States of America


Throwbot XT is a small, advanced, throwable tactical robot system designed and built by ReconRobotics. It provides warfighters and police forces with enhanced situational awareness in urban warfare and surveillance operations.

The robot can be deployed to gather intelligence data and provide improved audio and video reconnaissance capabilities. It protects military and SWAT personnel from enemy combatants and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). It also enhances mission planning and reduces collateral damage.

The robot was introduced at the Eurosatory defence and security exhibition held in Paris in June 2012 and was also demonstrated at the International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX) 2013 in Abu Dhabi.

The US Army's Rapid Equipping Force awarded a $13.9m indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract for up to 1,000 Throwbot XT robot systems in June 2012. The robots are currently in service with a number of law enforcement agencies worldwide.

Throwbot XT design and features


Related content


Recon Scout XT Reconnaissance Robot, US

Recon Scout XT, a small throwable reconnaissance robot designed and manufactured by ReconRobotics, is for use in law enforcement and military applications.


The Throwbot XT micro-robot system incorporates a robust and stealthy design with both audio and video features, and high mobility. It is capable of performing under dangerous environmental conditions and can withstand water and dust.

The system is operated by two personnel and can be carried in a 36cm-long, compact Throwbot XT MOLLE tactical pack, which is made of 1,000D CoRdura fabric and features two vent holes. It can be deployed within five seconds.

The robot has a length of 20.9cm, height of 11.4cm and a weight of 1.2lb, while the wheel to wheel width is 19.3cm. It can operate in any of three pre-determined transmitting frequencies, allowing operators to deploy about three robots in one area simultaneously.

The Throwbot XT Audio robot is equipped with a microphone, which generates 35dB sound pressure levels.

Sensors onboard the tactical defence robot

The versatile tactical robot system is equipped with black and white image sensors to capture audio and video information with 60° field of view in real-time. The image sensors generate 30 frames a second.

"Throwbot XT is fitted with an automatic infrared optical system to collect audio and video data up to a distance of 30m." 

The robot is also fitted with an automatic infrared (IR) optical system to collect audio and video data up to a distance of 30m, even in low light / night operational conditions. It is attached with two antennae to transmit analogue radio signals.

Operator control unit II for Throwbot XT

The Throwbot XT throwable robot is controlled by a handheld operator control unit II (OCU II), which can be used for up to two hours. The robot provides immediate situational awareness to the warfighters by transmitting audio and video information through walls, windows and doors to the OCU II in real-time.

The OCU II has a width of 14.2cm, screen size of 8.9cm and weight of 0.73kg. It is 51cm-high with its antennas extended and 24.1cm-high with them down. It is fitted with two antennae, a power switch, a charging port and headphone and audio / video out jacks.

Rugged, shock-resistant military robot

"It has a drop shock-resistance of 9m and a throw shock-resistance of 36m." 

The tactical robot features a pair of polymer wheels with crossbars, each wheel is powered independently by a small, high-power-density DC motor developed by MICROMO.

The robot can reach a speed of 1.5fps and can operate in indoor environments with a non line of sight (NLOS) range of 30m and in outdoor areas with a line of sight (LOS) range of 91m. It has a drop shock-resistance of 9m and a throw shock-resistance of 36m.

The Throwbot XT operates at 22dB at a distance of 6.09m and can conduct missions for up to one hour on a flat terrain, also it is capable of operating in water for about five minutes.

Defence Technology